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LVTC workshop together with local partners, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

LOCAL KNOW-HOW

WfW enables young people from low-income areas to receive water-specific vocational training. Graduates improve the water supply system on a long-term basis and enhance their own livelihood.


CURRENT SITUATION

Vocational Training in Zambia

Zambia has a shortage of qualified water supply specialists. There are 23 vocational schools in the country, but only few offer water-specific training. Financial support for secondary and tertiary education by the industry and the state is low, which means that costs must be covered primarily by the students. This leads to a lack of learning opportunities and expensive training positions.

Water Sector in Zambia

The water sector in Zambia provides a good basis. Eleven water suppliers are working on public contracts throughout the country and are audited annually by the National Council for Water Access and Sanitation (NWASCO). There are also a few private providers. However, there is little exchange between the industry and the educational sector. The great potential of cooperation is therefore not fully realised.


Zambia lacks qualified specialists to build and maintain water supply systems. The example of Switzerland shows that investments in vocational training yield great benefits to an economy in the long-run.


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Training young Zambians at a LVTC workshop, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

JOB MARKET FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

The majority of the population in Lusaka is under 20 years old. Many young people are looking for training in order to pursue a professional career. Affordable and professional education enables these young people to create a livelihood for themselves. In addition, social added value through the development of the urban water supply system is created.

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Fostering female participation in LVTC courses, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

GENDER

In Sub-Saharan Africa, 71% of water procurement tasks are performed by women. However, technical professions are regarded as a male domain and water systems are almost exclusively set up by men. The targeted promotion of women in the training and practice of water-specific professions reduces prejudices and improves equal opportunities.

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Leaking water pipe, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

NON-REVENUE WATER

Every pipe system loses water between the catchment or treatment and the consumer. This water is called Non-Revenue Water (NRW). In Sub-Saharan Africa it can reach up to 70%. Qualified specialists are the key to improving this situation in the long term.

GOALS

The strengthening of the local vocational school improves the local water sector in a sustainable way. Our goals are based on this vision:

1

Enable young people from low-income areas to pursue vocational training


2

Improve and expand the infrastructure and staff of the school


3

Encourage the integration of school, water suppliers and production companies


MEASURES

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Participants of a course at LVTC, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

BUILDING LOCAL CAPACITY

By creating educational opportunities in the water sector, local capacities are being strengthened in order to maintain and expand existing as well as future water supply systems.

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LVTC workshop together with local partners, Lusaka / Lior Etter, WfW

WORKSHOPS

Together with the LVTC, actors from the local water sector and experts from the Swiss sanitation sector, WfW developed innovative workshops for students. These workshops introduce the latest technologies as well as pipe systems and prepare students to meet the demands of the labour market.

PROJECT

SUPPORT WfW

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FOSTER VOCATIONAL TRAINING

Support our projects in Africa and promote access to vocational training for young Zambians.